Train S.M.A.R.T. & Beat the Heat

Q: It’s incredibly hot during the summer months. How do you push through the heat?

Amy Marsh answers

A: Sizzling summers can be brutal. When training outside in scorching temps and humidity, your sweat-rate increases, your heart-rate is higher and you feel more sluggish overall. So why even bother stepping outside? Because there are plenty of smart ways to beat the heat and make it worth-while.

Be "SMART" & Beat the Heat

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Training outside during the summer may feel like a chore, leaving you un-motivated to even bother. But when you follow these summer fitness guidelines, you’ll be sure to get in a productive workout and — more importantly — you’ll “B. SMART” about it.

B - Bottles of water. If you remember nothing else, remember to drink before, during and after your workouts. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty. It never hurts to have multiple bottles, or at least have the water fountains mapped out in case you need to refill.

S – Substitution. It’s okay to tailor your training sessions to the weather. When it’s hot and humid, go swimming instead of running. Or, consider a bike ride to catch a little breeze.

M – Maintenance. Pick a pace you can sustain. If needed, reduce the intensity or length of your workout and take breaks. It’s common for some athletes to have a lower tolerance to heat, so do what it takes to stay within your means.

A – Apparel. Dress appropriately by wearing lightweight, loose-fitting clothing that will keep you cooler. Avoid dark colors which can attract the sun’s beaming rays.

R – Rise and shine!  It’s in your best interest to get up earlier during summertime. The air is always a bit cooler and less humid in the early hours. For an extra energy boost to get you going first thing, try a pre-workout product. You could also wait until after the sun sets if you’re not a morning person. Either way, avoid exercising during the hottest part of the day, which is typically 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

T – Take it indoors. When you’re most concerned or simply can’t get outside during the cooler hours, stay inside. Gyms have air conditioning, which will help you beat the heat when all else fails.

Amy Marsh is a four time Ironman champion, two time IronDistance champion, and was named the 2010 USAT Long Distance Triathlete of the Year. Brandon Marsh has been competing in triathlons since 1988, and can be counted on to be a top-10 contender in every event he enters. Got a question about swim-bike-run or sports nutrition for Team Marsh? Email them at ask.the.triathletes@gmail.com. On Twitter, follow Brandon @BrandonMarshTX and follow Amy @AmyCMarsh.

Team Marsh

Amy Marsh is a four-time Ironman champion, two-time IronDistance champion, and was named the 2010 USAT Long Distance Triathlete of the Year. Brandon Marsh has been competing in triathlons since 1988, and can be counted on to be a top-10 contender in every event he enters. Got a question about swim-bike-run or sports nutrition for Team Marsh? Email them at ask.the.triathletes@gmail.com.

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About Team Marsh

Amy Marsh is a four-time Ironman champion, two-time IronDistance champion, and was named the 2010 USAT Long Distance Triathlete of the Year. Brandon Marsh has been competing in triathlons since 1988, and can be counted on to be a top-10 contender in every event he enters. Got a question about swim-bike-run or sports nutrition for Team Marsh? Email them at ask.the.triathletes@gmail.com.

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